Munro Waterfront

Munro Waterfront

So the sound of hammers of the ships carpenters was heard along this harbor for the first time – a resonance that rang over the fields and woods for more than a century. A sound so penetrating that woodsmen getting ship timber in nearby forests needed no watches to tell them when noon and suppertime had arrived. A hammering so all-pervading that old people remembered it as the dominant feature of Mattapoisett.”

This beautiful 1-acre waterfront parcel was a gift in 1976 of Ruth Munro, who lived in the big yellow house across the street on the corner of Water and Pearl Streets. Mrs. Munro’s late husband was from a family long associated with Mattapoisett and its whaling history. In fact, this vacant parcel was part of the actual site of the town’s first shipyard. It was acquired in 1752 by shipbuilder Charles Stetson of Scituate. Within 25 years, according to Charles S. Mendell, Jr., no less than eight other shipbuilders established shipyards and wharves in this town. Mattapoisett became famous as the Whaleship building capital of the world.

Seven years ago, the trust held its first major fund-raising. Because of severe erosion, some of which was undermining the most westerly of the town wharves, it was decided to have a seawall constructed the entire 450-foot length of this property. Individuals who love Mattapoisett played a major effort by contributing more than $100,000 to have the seawall built. It was a remarkable achievement!

With an unobstructed view of the harbor and in the center of the village, the Munro parcel has become a prime land trust holding. This was where Mattapoisett’s ship-building began in the 1700’s. Now it’s a peaceful place to sit on a bench and contemplate the activity in the harbor.
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